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PODCAST SERIES MY CAPE YORK LIFE AVAILABLE NOW – GREAT STORIES FROM FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

mcylWe’ve reached the half-way point of series one in the wonderful Cape York NRM podcast My Cape York Life – with plenty of good stories told and many more to come.

The stories are entertaining, inspiring, and often hilarious. You’ll hear about epic wet season adventures, close encounters with crocodiles, the Cape’s first attempt at helicopter cattle mustering, and the joys and challenges of living in remote and isolated places.

Last year, my friends at Cape York Natural Resource Management and South Cape York Catchments decided to give the region’s land managers a place to tell and share their own remarkable stories. And My Cape York Life was born. Lyndal Scobell travelled the Cape, recording the stories. I was invited to do the editing and audio production – and I’ve loved every minute of it.

Episode 4 came out yesterday – we meet Louise Stone at the height of turtle nesting season near Mapoon on western Cape York. Louise was co-ordinator of the Mapoon Land and Sea Rangers, who work to protect vulnerable and endangered turtles and their nesting sites along the beautiful Gulf of Carpentaria coast.

In episode 3, we met Mikayla Down and Wilfred Peter, traditional owners of Lama Lama Country, on the northern coast of Princess Charlotte Bay. Mikayla and Wilfred work with Yintjingga Aboriginal Corporation’s Lama Lama Rangers, caring for and managing traditional land and sea country from Silver Plains in the north to Marina Plains in the south.

In our first two episodes, we sat by the Wenlock River, on the north-west Cape, listening to Shelley Lyon tell stories of her 40 adventurous years on Cape York. Shelley has extensive conservation experience from decades working in the Cape’s national parks and private conservation properties with husband Barry. You can click to hear episode 1 and episode 2.

Still to come in this series of My Cape York Life, the ups and downs of raising cattle on the Cape, the joys and challenges of leading a small Cape York indigenous community, how an ecologist from London made her home on a farm near Cooktown, and we meet a cattle farmer and entirely self-taught award-winning plant and wildlife expert at Shipton’s Flat.

My Cape York Life is brought to you by Cape York NRM, with support from South Cape York Catchments, and the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

Hann River roadhouse

Hann River roadhouse

 

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2017 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, community, EFFINCUE, environment, far north Queensland, indigenous, People

 

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MY CAPE YORK LIFE – A PODCAST OF GREAT STORIES FROM CAPE YORK PENINSULA

mcylI love good stories. This podcast series is full of them. It’s called My Cape York Life, made by Cape York NRM, launched on February 10. You can find My Cape York Life in your podcast app or stream/download here

And here’s a 60 second sample

Cape York Peninsula is my favourite place.I love its wide-open spaces, its earthy colours, its bone-jarring dirt roads. I admire the tenacious spirit of the people who call it home, and I love their stories.

cy-2012-547It’s not easy living and travelling on the Cape. It’s rugged, and beautiful, all at once. Distance and remoteness challenge notions of community and connection. My Cape York Life takes you to the Cape’s tropical savannas, lush rainforests, abundant wetlands, its magnificent coastline and pristine rivers. You’ll meet the fascinating people who live and work here and take care of this surprisingly fragile place. My Cape York Life will take you to the Wenlock River, Mapoon, Lakeland, Port Stewart, Wujal Wujal and more.

The stories are entertaining, inspiring, and often hilarious. You’ll hear about epic wet season adventures, close encounters with crocodiles, the Cape’s first attempt at helicopter cattle mustering, and the joys and challenges of living in remote and isolated places.

Late last year, my friends at Cape York Natural Resource Management and South Cape York Catchments decided to give the region’s land managers a place to tell and share their own remarkable stories. And My Cape York Life was born. Lyndal Scobell travelled the Cape, recording the stories. I was invited to do the editing and audio production – and I’ve loved every minute of it.

If you live on the Cape, have a connection to the place, you’ve travelled there or dream of doing the great red dirt adventure one day, My Cape York Life is for you. Search My Cape York Life in your podcast app, and you can stream & download from http://landmanager.capeyorknrm.com.au/content/my-cape-york-life

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CHECK OUT OUR CAPE YORK PENINSULA PICTURE GALLERY – THEN COME VISIT US HERE IN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND!

We did our annual Cape York Peninsula road trip early this year, in June instead of October. It was early in the dry season, the roads were in great shape and we travelled to Lakeland, Laura, Lama Lama National Park, Coen, Wenlock River, Aurukun and Cooktown. All our interviews are up on this blog – and here’s an assortment of pictures from this wonderful part of the world.

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Pictures by ABC Open’s Suzie Cray, ABC Far North legend Phil Staley, Lyndal Scobell from Cape York NRM, and me.

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2013 in Aboriginal, arts & culture, Cape York Peninsula, Coral Sea, EFFINCUE, environment, far north Queensland, indigenous

 

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AN INDIGENOUS FUTURE MADE OF ANCIENT AND NEW – MEET DAVID CLAUDIE AT CHUULANGUN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

IMG_1509All over indigenous Australia, there are people who have returned to live on their traditional country, rather than in towns or communities to which they have no real cultural connection. And there are others working towards that goal. In the 1970s, the idea of going back to live on country began to be called the homelands movement – and one of its pioneers in far north Queensland is David Claudie.

David is chairman of the Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation, formed in 2002 by the descendants of a Kuuku I’yu Northern Kaanju ancestor.

The Northern Kaanju people began their struggle for recognition as custodians of their Cape York country in the 1970s. In the 80s they began re-occupying their land on sand-ridge country between the Wenlock and Pascoe rivers, many hours drive from the nearest small towns.

These days David Claudie and about 25 others live on country – in a remote, modest, effective and environmentally sustainable community at Chuulangun. There’s an entrepreneurial flavour to the many projects running there – including a carbon abatement strategy, employment and training programs, and an indigenous medicine project.

David Claudie challenges many of the commonly held notions about indigenous people. He doesn’t much care for the  oft-used term “traditional owner”  – he says you won’t understand indigenous people from anthropology texts or the Native Title Act.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear my interview with David Claudie

Read more about Chuulangun at http://www.kaanjungaachi.com.au/ChuulangunAboriginalCorporation.htm

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Pictures by ABC Open reporter Suze Cray, ABC Far North’s Phil Staley, Lyndal Scobell from Cape York NRM, and me.

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, community, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, indigenous, Radio Feed

 

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QLD GOVT MOVES TO REPLACE WILD RIVERS PROCESS — WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Queensland’s Wild Rivers Act was a contentious creature long before then premier Peter Beattie steered it through Parliament in 2005, with strong support from the Wilderness Society. Environmentalists loved it. Opponents said it sold out far north Queensland in return for “green” electoral support in the south-east corner. Cape York people said it restricted economic opportunities, especially for indigenous folk.

The Wild Rivers Act said the Government could regulate or prohibit “certain activities” on or near rivers that met certain environmental criteria by declaring them to be “wild rivers”. Several Cape York rivers have since been declared “wild rivers”.

The new Queensland Government had said it would review the Act and withdraw the declarations made under it. Since taking office, the Government is on record as saying it will replace the “wild rivers” process with a Cape York bio-regional plan. Work has commenced on that plan.


OUR ON-LINE POLL ASKED IF YOU SUPPORT THE GOVERNMENT’S APPROACH. 42% SAID YES, 50% SAID NO. 7% VOTED FOR OTHER OPTIONS. THE POLL HAS NOW CLOSED. WHILE IT WAS RUNNING, A LINK TO ADVERTISING MATERIAL APPEARED BRIEFLY ON THIS PAGE. IT WAS PUT THERE BY THE SERVICE THAT PROVIDES A PLATFORM FOR THESE POLLS. I DO NOT CONSENT TO THIS AND DO NOT ENDORSE THE ADS. WE WILL FIND ANOTHER WAY TO CONDUCT POLLS IN FUTURE.

Natural Resources and Mines Minister Andrew Cripps says “wild rivers” was a politically driven process. Mr Cripps has told ABC Far North its replacement will consider Cape York mining and other development proposals “on their merits” and “politics won’t be getting in the road”.

Click on the audio player to hear Andrew Cripps with our reporter Nikolai Beilharz.

The first project likely to be considered under the new system is Cape Alumina’s Pisolite Hills bauxite mine, on hold since the Wenlock River was declared a wild river in 2010. Cape Alumina M.D Graeme Sherlock explains the project to the ABC’s Lauren Day.

The Wilderness Society’s Gavin McFajin says the Pisolite Hills project should not go ahead.

For more on this issue go to http://www.abc.net.au/rural/regions/farnorthnorthqueensland/


 

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