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Tag Archives: marine environment

LOOKING AFTER SEAGRASS – KIMBERLEY STYLE

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This morning I met the volunteers working on the Broome Community Seagrass Monitoring Project as they came ashore at Town Beach. They’d just finished almost four hours looking at the seagrass that is home or food to many of the marine creatures living in Roebuck Bay.

They’re out on the mudflats four times a year, to monitor the health of the local seagrass meadows – like so many ecosystems, the seagrass is vital and fragile. The scientists tell us that globally, two football fields worth of the stuff disappears each hour – mostly as a result of human made environmental pressures. When seagrass declines, fish, turtle, dugong – all manner of sea creatures – are adversely affected.

Today the Broome volunteers have Len McKenzie with them – Len leads the national Seagrass-Watch program.

LISTEN to my interview with Len, project co-ordinator Julia Rau and the volunteers

LEN McKENZIE & VOLUNTEERS AFTER A MORNING WITH THE SEAGRASS

LEN McKENZIE & VOLUNTEERS AFTER A MORNING WITH THE SEAGRASS

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Posted by on October 28, 2014 in KIMBERLEY

 

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THE GREAT BARRIER REEF – MORE THAN JUST SCIENCE. GET TO KNOW THE PASSIONATE STORY OF OUR REEF

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Our Great Barrier Reef is never far from the news headlines. Its well-being, its future, ways to exploit and preserve it, all regular subjects of community discussion and public debate here in far north Queensland and across the nation.

It’s one of the seven natural wonders of the world, the only living thing on Earth visible from space. It’s bigger than quite a few countries – a network of complex but vulnerable ecosystems that sustains an abundance of marine life. It starts offshore of Bundaberg and parallels the Queensland coast up past the tip of Cape York in a marine park some 2300km long. 345,000 square kilometres, three thousand individual reefs and a thousand islands.

The statistics and the science tells us a great deal about the reef and the threats it faces. But that is an incomplete story, according to Iain McCalman. Iain has gotten to know the reef over many years, and he believes the Great Barrier Reef was created as much by human imagination as it was by natural processes. By considering human perceptions of and interactions with the Reef, we gain a more complete understanding of it, and of how to care for it.

reefIain tells of the people drawn to the reef, often in life-changing ways, from Captain Cook and Matthew Flinders to castaway Ted Banfield and reef champions Judith Wright and John Busst – in his recently published The Reef – A Passionate History.

LISTEN to my interview with Iain McCalman here

Iain McCalman is a Research Professor in history at the University of Sydney and co-Director of the Sydney Environment Institute.

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Posted by on February 13, 2014 in Cairns Queensland, Coral Sea, EFFINCUE, environment, far north Queensland

 

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ABC FAR NORTH WILDLIFE MAN LAUNCHES NEW FIELD GUIDE TO CREATURES OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF

DSC_0161Our ABC Far North wildlife correspondent Martin Cohen is once again a published author – and if you’re thinking about a trip to the Great Barrier Reef, take a copy of his latest book with you.

Martin launched 101 Animals of the Great Barrier Reef in Cairns this morning. It’s the latest in a series of field guides to the creatures of tropical far north Queensland put together since 2009 by Martin and his late partner Julia Cooper.

All the birds, mammals, fish, corals & reptiles you’ll see on the Reef are illustrated and there’s information and stories about them. It’s about to become available at tour operators and book shops in Cairns and Townsville, and will be available online here

LISTEN to my interview with Martin here

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Posted by on September 17, 2013 in Cairns Queensland, Coral Sea, EFFINCUE, environment, far north Queensland, wildlife and animals, Wildlife Martin Cohen

 

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MANGROVES ARE EVERYWHERE IN FNQ – BUT WHAT EXACTLY IS A MANGROVE?

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You don’t have to go very far in FNQ to find mangroves. Queensland is home to almost half of Australia’s mangrove areas, and a fair slice of that is here in far north Queensland. They’re not the gentlest of places – stifling hot, teeming with mozzies and sandflies, and there’s a good chance that slide mark in the mud was made by a crocodile who’s had an eye on you for a while now.

Mangroves are not everyone’s cup of tea – but I love them. Great for a get away from it all wander, and if you go with some info on just how these plants live in such harsh conditions, it’s a fascinating journey.

Mangroves are various types of trees up to medium height, and shrubs, that grow along our coasts in saline sediment habitats. The plants live between the high and low tide lines, where trees ought not flourish. But these species have adapted to a tough environment and play a really important role in the life of our sea creatures. About 70 per cent of the fish and seafood we eat uses mangroves for breeding or shelter.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear ABC Far North wildlife correspondent Martin Cohen explain why mangroves exist, how they work and why they’re important.

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2 martDr Martin Cohen is ABC Far North wildlife correspondent. He’s on my radio program Wednesdays at 4.45pm. Read more about Martin at http://www.wildaboutaustralia.com/

 

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