RSS

Category Archives: Radio Feed

AN INDIGENOUS FUTURE MADE OF ANCIENT AND NEW – MEET DAVID CLAUDIE AT CHUULANGUN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

IMG_1509All over indigenous Australia, there are people who have returned to live on their traditional country, rather than in towns or communities to which they have no real cultural connection. And there are others working towards that goal. In the 1970s, the idea of going back to live on country began to be called the homelands movement – and one of its pioneers in far north Queensland is David Claudie.

David is chairman of the Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation, formed in 2002 by the descendants of a Kuuku I’yu Northern Kaanju ancestor.

The Northern Kaanju people began their struggle for recognition as custodians of their Cape York country in the 1970s. In the 80s they began re-occupying their land on sand-ridge country between the Wenlock and Pascoe rivers, many hours drive from the nearest small towns.

These days David Claudie and about 25 others live on country – in a remote, modest, effective and environmentally sustainable community at Chuulangun. There’s an entrepreneurial flavour to the many projects running there – including a carbon abatement strategy, employment and training programs, and an indigenous medicine project.

David Claudie challenges many of the commonly held notions about indigenous people. He doesn’t much care for the  oft-used term “traditional owner”  – he says you won’t understand indigenous people from anthropology texts or the Native Title Act.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear my interview with David Claudie

Read more about Chuulangun at http://www.kaanjungaachi.com.au/ChuulangunAboriginalCorporation.htm

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Pictures by ABC Open reporter Suze Cray, ABC Far North’s Phil Staley, Lyndal Scobell from Cape York NRM, and me.

 
Comments Off on AN INDIGENOUS FUTURE MADE OF ANCIENT AND NEW – MEET DAVID CLAUDIE AT CHUULANGUN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

Posted by on July 10, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, community, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, indigenous, Radio Feed

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MEET THE LAURA RANGERS – CARING FOR COUNTRY ON CAPE YORK PENINSULA FNQ

ABC CY 2013 011There are many challenges for Australia’s remote indigenous communities – and one of the biggest is creating real and meaningful employment. Without it, people can’t make a living, they get caught in a downward spiral of welfare dependence, and younger people drift away to larger urban centres where their future is not always going to be brighter.

In north and western Queensland, a relatively new program has been showing very promising results. Local traditional owners are employed by local Aboriginal organisations as indigenous rangers, looking after country. They do important work, looking after indigenous land, national parks and sea country.

The indigenous rangers use their culturally informed understanding of country to monitor and preserve environments, often working with scientists to study wildlife and fauna, and deal with invasive plant and weed pest species.

So far the Queensland Government funds 53 indigenous rangers in the north and west of the state. Five of them work for the Laura Rangers, in a town with a regular population of about 100. Over the past few weeks, the population swelled to many times that, as crowds came to town for the Laura races and rodeo, and the Laura Dance Festival. LISTEN Click on the red arrow to meet the Laura Rangers and hear about the country they care for at Laura FNQ

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 My thanks to Sue Marsh at the Laura Rangers and Lyndal Scobell at Cape York N-R-M for their help in preparing that report.

 

 
Comments Off on MEET THE LAURA RANGERS – CARING FOR COUNTRY ON CAPE YORK PENINSULA FNQ

Posted by on July 8, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, EFFINCUE, environment, indigenous, Radio Feed

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

NOW HERE’S A PROJECT! BUILD AND FLY YOUR OWN AIRCRAFT

J430-1

I built quite a few model aeroplanes as a kid. Mostly Airfix kits, and one made from scratch out of balsa wood that actually flew, powered by a small and very noisy engine. I’ll never forget the excitement, the sense of achievement I felt watching that little plane take to the sky for the first time. Now multiply that feeling by at least a hundred, and that’s what it must be like to build your own real life aircraft, one you can fly yourself and go places in.

Home built aircraft, or kit planes, are very popular in Australia – lower purchase prices and operating costs are a key factor. But many owners will tell you one of the big attractions was the challenge of building their own aircraft. There are more than 100 different types of home built aircraft flying in Australia, and there’s more on the way. One of the best known is the Jabiru http://www.jabiru.net.au/  – made in Bundaberg, the home of Australian aviation pioneer Bert Hinkler.

You buy the aircraft in kit form and it depends on you how long it’ll take to build. A good example is Cairns pilot John Martin – who took 1400 hours. Once you’ve got it registered and you have your pilot licence, you’re ready to fly.

Home built aircraft owners are represented by the Sport Aircraft Association of Australia www.saaafnq.com

Its Cairns chapter is having an information night next Thursday July 4 in Cairns for people thinking of buying or building a home built or kit plane. You’ll hear from people who’ve done it successfully, get the chance to ask questions and find out if it’s for you. The information session starts at 7pm at the North Queensland Aero Club www.nqac.com.au

LISTEN John Martin and Martin Boyle know they made the right decision. Click on the red arrow to hear John and Martin talk about building and flying their own planes.

Contact John j-martin@bigpond.net.au or Martin martinboyle53@bigpond.com for more information.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 
Comments Off on NOW HERE’S A PROJECT! BUILD AND FLY YOUR OWN AIRCRAFT

Posted by on June 28, 2013 in Cairns Queensland, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Radio Feed, rd on the road

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MEET THE AURUKUN SCHOOL BAND – COMING TO CAIRNS FOR A CONCERT IN JULY

map-of-yarrabah-photo-via-yarrabah-state-schoolYou’ll find the town of Yarrabah about an hour’s drive south-east of Cairns – an indigenous community of about 2500 people. It was formed in the 1890s, when Anglican missionary Ernest Gribble encouraged the area’s indigenous people to move to the site of the present-day town.

By the early 1900s, Yarrabah had its own indigenous brass band, beginning a rich tradition of instrumental music in the area that thrived until the early 1970s. The Queensland Music Festival hopes to spark a revival with next month’s Yarrabah Band Festival.

The Festival is on Monday July 22, with performances by the newly-formed Yarrabah community band and indigenous school bands from across Cape York Peninsula. Kids aged six and up have been working and playing music with QMF teams at Cape York Aboriginal Australian Academy campuses in Coen, Hopevale and Aurukun in preparation for the Festival.

I got to hear two of the school bands in action on our recent Cape York road trip. At Coen, we found the kids rehearsing through their lunch break, and at Aurukun, we were there when the band played for the whole school for the first time. It was a great day for the Aurukun school community.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear the Aurukun band’s first concert performance and meet their musical mentors

We heard Queensland Music Festival project coordinator Emma Kurik and Australian jazz legend John Morrison with reporter Phil Staley. The Yarrabah Band Festival begins at 4.30pm Monday 22 July at Bishop Malcolm Park Yarrabah – it’s a free event. http://www.qmf.org.au/public/public/?id=300

As part of the celebrations, visiting musicians Darren Percival (The Voice), Thelma Plum (Deadly Award Winner) and the Morrison Brothers will take to the stage before an all-in, massed-band finale.

You can watch a video of the Aurukun band at https://open.abc.net.au/openregions/qld-far-north-28qv9td/posts/brass-band-babies-94ez0gc

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 
Comments Off on MEET THE AURUKUN SCHOOL BAND – COMING TO CAIRNS FOR A CONCERT IN JULY

Posted by on June 17, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, indigenous, music, Radio Feed, rd on the road

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

THE JAMES COOK LANDING RE-ENACTMENT 2013 – COOKTOWN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

RE-ENACTMENT CAST TAKE A BOW

RE-ENACTMENT CAST TAKE A BOW

n June of 1770, the British vessel HMS Endeavour was sailing along the far north Queensland coast. Captain James Cook and his crew had travelled far since leaving England in August 1768. Their luck was not with them this day and the Endeavour struck a reef north of Cape Tribulation. Many place names in the area derive from this story: Mount Sorrow, Endeavour Reef, and Cape Tribulation.

Cook and his crew nursed the Endeavour up the coast to an inviting river mouth and beached the ship at what is now Cooktown. Repairs were made, and then they waited for favourable weather in which to set sail for England. In all, the Englishmen stayed almost seven weeks at Cooktown. The local indigenous people, the Guugu Yimithirr, had seen them coming and kept their distance, but they eventually made contact with these strange, pale visitors. There was curiosity on both sides of the encounter, conflict, and the first act of reconciliation between indigenous Australians and Europeans. And it’s the first time the word “kangaroo” entered the English language.Botanist Joseph Banks recorded it in his diary, having asked the name of a local creature that baffled the Englishmen. Gangurru is the Guugu Yimithirr word for “grey kangaroo”.

Every June since 1960, on the Queen’s Birthday weekend, the people of Cooktown re-enact the events of 1770. The Queen saw it herself in 1970, during the Cook bicentennial. The event is the centre-piece of the annual Cooktown Discovery Festival http://www.cooktowndiscoveryfestival.com.au/

The Cook landing re-enactment has changed considerably in its 54 years. It’s a faithful telling of Cook’s own account, recorded in his journals, and has more recently included an indigenous perspective, drawn from Guugu Yimithirr oral history. The result is an engaging and informative spectacle, complete with costumes, musket fire and an enormous kangaroo. And it takes place right where the events depicted really occured, 243 years ago.

More about Cooktown http://www.tourismcapeyork.com/

Read about the James Cook Museum in Cooktown http://www.nationaltrust.org.au/qld/james-cook-museum

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear highlights of the 54th re-enactment of the Cook landing

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 
Comments Off on THE JAMES COOK LANDING RE-ENACTMENT 2013 – COOKTOWN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

Posted by on June 14, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, Coral Sea, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Radio Feed, rd on the road

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

IF THE DEAD COULD SPEAK – FNQ HISTORY AS HEARD IN THE COOKTOWN CEMETERY

COOKTOWN CEMETERY 005

Cooktown is one of my favourite far north Queensland towns. It sits on the banks of the Endeavour River, about a four hour drive from Cairns on the now sealed all the way Mulligan Highway. The town began as a port for the Palmer River gold rush in the 1870s. But it was first seen by Europeans a century earlier, when James Cook and the crew of the Endeavour sought refuge here after damaging their ship on a reef.

There’s plenty to see and do in Cooktown, and the rich history of the region is very accessible to visitors. The local historical society is a treasure-house of information, and each year the town re-enacts the Cook landing and the first interactions between Europeans and the local indigenous people.

When you visit Cooktown, make sure you take a wander through the local cemetery. Local tour companies will show you through and tell you stories of the people buried there. You’ll learn about the mysterious disappearance of a French naval vessel, the story of pioneer Mary Watson, and the still baffling tale of the Normanby woman – a fair-skinned and probably Scandinavian woman who lived with Aborigines at Normanby River in the 1880s.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear Wayne Brennan from Cooktown Tours guide us through the Cooktown Cemetery.

More about Cooktown Tours at http://www.cooktowntours.com.au/Cooktown_Tours.html

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 
Comments Off on IF THE DEAD COULD SPEAK – FNQ HISTORY AS HEARD IN THE COOKTOWN CEMETERY

Posted by on June 13, 2013 in Cape York Peninsula, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Radio Feed

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

TUNE IN TO INDIGENOUS RADIO AURUKUN CAPE YORK PENINSULA

HANGING OUT IN THE 107.7 STUDIO AURUKUN

HANGING OUT IN THE 107.7 STUDIO AURUKUN

Our radio station, ABC Far North, covers a huge area of Queensland. Our listening area is just a bit bigger than the state of Victoria. In many areas, we’re the only local station, and there are still places where you can’t hear us, or anything else. But many of the remote indigenous communities around far north Queensland have their own radio stations. We visited one last week – at Aurukun, on western Cape York Peninsula.

Aurukun is about 800 kilometres north-west of Cairns, one of Australia’s most remote communities. It’s home to about 1200 people, most of whom belong to one of five spiritual clan groups: Apalech, Winchanam, Wanam, Chara and Puutch. The local language is Wik Mungkan.

In the centre of town, you’ll find the Indigenous Knowledge Centre – a library, internet hub and radio station. That station has been back on air for a few months now, broadcasting on 107.7FM. The station is part of the Black Star Network http://qram.com.au/2013/03/23/aurukun-joins-black-star/

Centre co-ordinator Monica Haynes and her team make local programs in English and Wik Mungkan. And Monica is learning some Wik Mungkan from Jacinta Karyuka – Jacinta’s been doing work experience at the station, and she’s convinced radio is the career for her.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to tune in to 107.7 FM Aurukun and meet Monica & Jacinta.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 
Comments Off on TUNE IN TO INDIGENOUS RADIO AURUKUN CAPE YORK PENINSULA

Posted by on June 12, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, community, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, indigenous, Radio Feed

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,