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Category Archives: EFFINCUE

TONY COHEN – A TRIBUTE TO AN AUSTRALIAN ROCK MUSIC LEGEND

Tony Cohen

Record producer and sound engineer Tony Cohen has been remembered as a national treasure, a genius, and as the brain, ears and fingers behind some of Australia’s best music.

Tony died in Dandenong on August 2nd. He was 60.

He made hundreds of records and won three ARIA awards in a career that began in 1975. Tony worked closely with Nick Cave, and produced for The Cruel Sea, TISM, The Beasts of Bourbon, Split Enz, Models, The Go-Betweens, Paul Kelly and many others.

Tony helped create so much great and ground-breaking Australian music. Listen to the Tony Cohen story here

An early Tony Cohen record

 
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Posted by on August 8, 2017 in music

 

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PODCAST SERIES MY CAPE YORK LIFE AVAILABLE NOW – GREAT STORIES FROM FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

mcylWe’ve reached the half-way point of series one in the wonderful Cape York NRM podcast My Cape York Life – with plenty of good stories told and many more to come.

The stories are entertaining, inspiring, and often hilarious. You’ll hear about epic wet season adventures, close encounters with crocodiles, the Cape’s first attempt at helicopter cattle mustering, and the joys and challenges of living in remote and isolated places.

Last year, my friends at Cape York Natural Resource Management and South Cape York Catchments decided to give the region’s land managers a place to tell and share their own remarkable stories. And My Cape York Life was born. Lyndal Scobell travelled the Cape, recording the stories. I was invited to do the editing and audio production – and I’ve loved every minute of it.

Episode 4 came out yesterday – we meet Louise Stone at the height of turtle nesting season near Mapoon on western Cape York. Louise was co-ordinator of the Mapoon Land and Sea Rangers, who work to protect vulnerable and endangered turtles and their nesting sites along the beautiful Gulf of Carpentaria coast.

In episode 3, we met Mikayla Down and Wilfred Peter, traditional owners of Lama Lama Country, on the northern coast of Princess Charlotte Bay. Mikayla and Wilfred work with Yintjingga Aboriginal Corporation’s Lama Lama Rangers, caring for and managing traditional land and sea country from Silver Plains in the north to Marina Plains in the south.

In our first two episodes, we sat by the Wenlock River, on the north-west Cape, listening to Shelley Lyon tell stories of her 40 adventurous years on Cape York. Shelley has extensive conservation experience from decades working in the Cape’s national parks and private conservation properties with husband Barry. You can click to hear episode 1 and episode 2.

Still to come in this series of My Cape York Life, the ups and downs of raising cattle on the Cape, the joys and challenges of leading a small Cape York indigenous community, how an ecologist from London made her home on a farm near Cooktown, and we meet a cattle farmer and entirely self-taught award-winning plant and wildlife expert at Shipton’s Flat.

My Cape York Life is brought to you by Cape York NRM, with support from South Cape York Catchments, and the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

Hann River roadhouse

Hann River roadhouse

 

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2017 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, community, EFFINCUE, environment, far north Queensland, indigenous, People

 

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MY CAPE YORK LIFE – A PODCAST OF GREAT STORIES FROM CAPE YORK PENINSULA

mcylI love good stories. This podcast series is full of them. It’s called My Cape York Life, made by Cape York NRM, launched on February 10. You can find My Cape York Life in your podcast app or stream/download here

And here’s a 60 second sample

Cape York Peninsula is my favourite place.I love its wide-open spaces, its earthy colours, its bone-jarring dirt roads. I admire the tenacious spirit of the people who call it home, and I love their stories.

cy-2012-547It’s not easy living and travelling on the Cape. It’s rugged, and beautiful, all at once. Distance and remoteness challenge notions of community and connection. My Cape York Life takes you to the Cape’s tropical savannas, lush rainforests, abundant wetlands, its magnificent coastline and pristine rivers. You’ll meet the fascinating people who live and work here and take care of this surprisingly fragile place. My Cape York Life will take you to the Wenlock River, Mapoon, Lakeland, Port Stewart, Wujal Wujal and more.

The stories are entertaining, inspiring, and often hilarious. You’ll hear about epic wet season adventures, close encounters with crocodiles, the Cape’s first attempt at helicopter cattle mustering, and the joys and challenges of living in remote and isolated places.

Late last year, my friends at Cape York Natural Resource Management and South Cape York Catchments decided to give the region’s land managers a place to tell and share their own remarkable stories. And My Cape York Life was born. Lyndal Scobell travelled the Cape, recording the stories. I was invited to do the editing and audio production – and I’ve loved every minute of it.

If you live on the Cape, have a connection to the place, you’ve travelled there or dream of doing the great red dirt adventure one day, My Cape York Life is for you. Search My Cape York Life in your podcast app, and you can stream & download from http://landmanager.capeyorknrm.com.au/content/my-cape-york-life

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DOES BOB DYLAN DESERVE THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR LITERATURE?

bob-dylan

I’ve been listening to Bob Dylan for as long as I can remember, through all the ups and downs of my life and his career. I’ve tuned in for the sublime and the inspirational, and yes, for the dross as well. It’s been a long and usually rewarding journey.

So I’ve been intrigued by the global kerfuffle that followed the announcement of his Nobel Prize in literature last month. Rejoicing fans, academic snobbery – and some downright mean-spirited spleen venting too.

There are some big questions conjured by giving Bob the Nobel. Are song lyrics literature? You could make a case either way – but I vote “yes” on that one.

The bigger question is how can we give a bloke a prize in a specific category when he’s spent his whole career exercising his chameleon-like ability to resist, to defy categorisation? Dylan was famously asked at a mid-60s press conference whether he thought of himself as a singer or as a poet. “I think of myself more as a song and dance man”, he replied.

Recognition, it seems, extends to even the most mercurial.

I’ve done a radio piece on Dylan’s Nobel gong for the ABC Digital Show It’s Just Not Cricket – hosted by the marvellous Glynn Greensmith. It’s a 16-minute journey through the literary landscape of Bob Dylan songs, in which I suggest that literature is meant to be heard, as well as read. That literature should not repose like dead kings in musty books on dusty shelves, never to be visited or re-invented.

You can stream the audio here

 
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Posted by on November 5, 2016 in music, rd on the road

 

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Meet the woman preserving Horn Island’s most significant Word War II sites – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Meet the woman preserving Horn Island’s most significant Word War II sites – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

I’ve been lucky enough to travel to the Torres Strait islands many times. It’s one of the most beautiful places I’ve seen, and it’s full of good stories.

The Strait was Australia’s northern front-line during World War Two – and those difficult times are being wonderfully documented by Vanessa and Liberty Seekee at the Torres Strait Heritage Museum.

They’re online at http://www.torresstraitheritage.com/blog/?page_id=53 and here’s a current story from the hard-working crew at ABC Far North.

via Meet the woman preserving Horn Island’s most significant Word War II sites – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2016 in rd on the road, Torres Strait

 

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A DAY AT THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AVIATION MUSEUM MOORABBIN

test-viscount

The story of Australian aviation goes back to people like Lawrence Hargrave, Ross and Keith Smith, Bert Hinkler, Charles Kingsford Smith, Nancy Bird-Walton, Hudson Fysh. Remarkable people who pioneered flight down under.

They were larger than life characters – and so were the aircraft they flew. Aircraft have flight characteristics and styles that, for pilots and lovers of aviation, add up to distinct personalities. And when their flying days are done, old aircraft become something like old story-tellers.

Stand under a wing, or better still, climb aboard one of these old planes, and you begin to feel its history, the stories of the people it carried and the journeys it made. The TAA Viscount pictured at the top of the page flew in Cuba before coming to Australia – it’s thought to have carried Fidel Castro in the late 1950s.

The Australian National Aviation Museum, at Moorabbin airport in Melbourne, is the perfect place to see some classic aircraft and soak up the rich history of aviation in Australia. It has a wonderful collection of commercial and military aircraft – you can get very close to all of them and inside some. There’s really good information with the displays, and the friendly crew here are genuinely knowledgeable aviation enthusiasts.

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Posted by on September 13, 2016 in rd on the road

 

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BREXIT AND “OUR WORLD” – MEMORIES OF THE FIRST LIVE TV SATELLITE BROADCAST

I watched the Brexit result unfold on TV this past couple of days, as reporters did their live crosses from locations great and small across the U.K and Europe. These days, the live report from remote locations is common-place, and dreadfully over-used by many TV networks.

But it’s not that long ago that the means by which it’s done was breath-takingly brand new. By coincidence, Brexit fell on the anniversary of the first live international TV broadcast in June, 1967, an occasion celebrating, rather than retreating from, international relations.

Our_World_Newspaper_adThat first broadcast was called Our World. It was the first ever live, international television program, going to air early in the morning of June 26 (eastern Australian time). It was largely the idea of the great UK TV producer, Aubrey Singer, and had strong support from the European Broadcasting Union. 14 countries contributed live segments, and the show was seen by more than 400 million people in 30 nations.

Our World is probably best remembered for the UK sequence, which showed The Beatles performing their new single All You Need Is Love for the first time. But it should be remembered for much more – it was a “space age” technical achievement at a time when TV was barely a decade old in Australia.

We could see real time TV from all over the world, at a time when few of us could afford to travel overseas. Soon we would see live TV pictures from the Apollo moon landings, from far away sports events. Our World proved international live TV was possible, and that audiences were excited by it.

It was a complex and expensive production, delivered through control rooms around the world via three geostationary communication satellites (Intelsat I, Intelsat II and ATS-1). Something like ten thousand people worked on the broadcast, using enough broadcast cable to circle the globe several times. Every minute of every segment had to be delivered live – no videotape or overlay vision was allowed. And there were political complexities too – no politicians or heads of state were allowed to appear, and the Soviet Union and its Eastern Bloc dominions withdrew just days before the broadcast.

COOBY CREEK AROUND 1967

In Australia, the epicentre of Our World was a space tracking station at Cooby Creek, just north of Toowoomba in south-east Queensland. The incoming overseas program was fed from there into the domestic Australian Broadcasting Commission cable network and into our black and white TV sets. And when the time came, at 5.22am on June 26th, live links from around Australia were sent from Cooby Creek into the global broadcast.

Our World opened with the Vienna Boys Choir singing the theme song in 22 languages, followed by segments from Canada, the USA and Japan. The Australian sequence began with ABC reporter Brian King at a Melbourne tram depot, then Eric Hunter at the CSIRO plant growth laboratory in Canberra.

 

There was also a segment at the Parkes radio telescope, in central New South Wales, where reporter Kim Corcoran explained efforts to monitor what was then the most distant object known to us – Quasar 0237- 23. The remarkable Dr Peter Pockley was executive producer of the Australian segment, working out of the old ABC TV headquarters at Gore Hill in Sydney.

ABC TV CREW AT PARKES NSW DURING OUR WORLD BROADCAST

ABC TV CREW AT PARKES NSW DURING OUR WORLD BROADCAST

Our World was a huge leap forward for television. In an era when news took days to travel around the world, TV had showed us we could share our stories in pictures in real time.

I was an eight-year-old boy watching on a cold Antipodean winter morning as this apparently magical event unfolded. And I’ve never forgotten the feeling of being part of something bigger than the sum of its parts – it’s a feeling TV can still conjure. Not often, but when it tries. The better quality reporting of the Brexit result this past weekend, was such an occasion.

Read more about how Australia received and contributed to Our World, and about Australia’s space tracking stations here

And you can find videos from Our World – the Australian version here

 

 
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Posted by on June 26, 2016 in rd on the road

 

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