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Monthly Archives: November 2013

WORLD MUSIC IN CAIRNS NEXT YEAR – TONY HILLIER’S WORLD OF MUSIC

My favourite Cairns music venue is the Tanks Arts Centre

There’s plenty of history and atmosphere in what was a series of concrete fuel tanks built during World War Two. They contained crude oil that was pumped through underground pipes to fuel Navy ships on Trinity Inlet. They were decommissioned in 1987, and could so easily have been demolished or doomed to become historical artefacts. But the local council bought them and they were eventually converted to their current role –  a really unusual home for visual and performing arts.

One of the highlights on the Tanks calendar is the annual World Music subscription series

Tickets for the 2014 series go on sale on Monday – and Tony Hillier previews some of the acts coming to Cairns on this week’s World of Music. LISTEN here

PLAY LIST

Beautiful Mongolian Horse from the 2012 Hanggai’s album He Who Travels Far

Tu Te Vas from the 2011 Watussi album El Ovido

Closing Time from the 2007 Monsieur Camembert album Famous Blue Cheese

Meridionale from Kalascima’s 2012 album S.Maria Del Foggiaro

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TONY HILLIER CASTTony Hillier is one of Australia’s leading music journalists and a musician of long standing here in far north Queensland. His informed and insightful coverage of music features in The Weekend Australian and Rhythms magazine http://rhythms.com.au/

Tony Hillier’s World of Music is also available as a podcast. Search for Tony Hillier on your podcast app or in the iTunes store. And you can stay in touch with the FNQ music scene with Tony at http://www.entertainmentcairns.com/hilliers-hotline-archive.php

You can hear Tony on ABC Far North each Friday at 445pm.

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2013 in Cairns Queensland, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, music, rd on the road, Tony Hillier's World of Music

 

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THE ASHES ON FIRE AND AUSTRALIA FAVOURITES IN RUGBY LEAGUE WORLD CUP – PHIL STALEY’S THOUGHTS ON SPORTS

_MG_7611Australians love their sport – but I reckon no-one loves their sport quite like our Phil Staley. Indoor, outdoor, winter summer or somewhere in between – Phil loves it all. Stand at his desk here at ABC Far North and you get the feeling you’ve just run on to Lang Park or the MCG. Phil has a gift for talking about sport in a way that even people who can’t stand sport will enjoy.

He gets past the hype and the stats to the magic ingredient that makes sport so compelling – the people who play it and the people who love it. Phil talks about sport each Friday on ABC Far North at 5:15pm – now you can tune in online as well. Phil’s Thoughts on Sports are podcast too – search Phil Staley in your podcast app.

This week: the Ashes series is on fire – Australia’s big win in Brisbane was full of controversy, with sledging and player well-being featuring highly in the discussion. And far north Queensland legend Billy Slater is a good chance of playing in tomorrow night’s Rugby League World Cup final against New Zealand.

LISTEN here

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2013 in EFFINCUE, Phil Staley Thoughts on Sports, Sport

 

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THE DAINTREE BLOCKADE 30 YEARS ON – THE START OF THE ROAD TO WORLD HERITAGE AND THE TOURISM INDUSTRY

DAINTREE FRONTLINE - PIC COURTESY www.wettropics.gov.au

DAINTREE FRONTLINE – PIC COURTESY RUSSEL FRANCIS

In early December 1983 far north Queensland was the lead story on the news just about every night. The Douglas Shire Council, with the support of the Queensland Government, began to push a road through pristine rainforest in the Daintree, north of Cairns.

The road had been proposed a number of times over three decades, but the sudden move to begin construction caught many by surprise and set off almost a year of protest in the Daintree rainforest. At its peak, there were confrontations between police and protestors, environmentalists maintaining vigils high up in the trees or buried up to their necks in soil, trying to block bulldozers.

This weekend, the blockade will be remembered at a 30th anniversary event at Ferntree Rainforest Lodge and many of the original protestors will be there.

While it ultimately failed to prevent the construction of the road, the blockade gave the Daintree a national, even an international profile that gave birth to the now lucrative tourism industry locals couldn’t begin to imagine back then. And it eventually led to the region getting a world heritage listing.

LISTEN to the story of the Daintree blockade here

 

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PICTURES FROM THE TOP OF AUSTRALIA – TORRES STRAIT AND NORTHERN CAPE YORK PENINSULA

THURSDAY ISLAND WHARF

THURSDAY ISLAND WHARF

My last blog post was all about the sea journey from Cairns, through the Coral Sea to the Torres Strait islands and northern Cape York Peninsula. The MV Trinity Bay is the only working cargo ship in Australia that also carries passengers, and it takes about 40 hours from Cairns to Horn Island. After almost two very gentle days at sea, it was time to find my land legs and go wandering on Horn and Thursday islands.

There’s plenty to see on both, and the ferry ride between the two takes you across water so blue you’ll need to come up with a new adjective to describe it. On Horn Island, my guides were Liberty and Vanessa See Kee – who run the Torres Strait Heritage Museum and some very enjoyable tours of the island

Horn Island was a very active military base during World War Two. Vanessa and Liberty will show you the aircraft wrecks and tell you the stories – they know their stuff and they’re lovely people. Highly recommended! I also enjoyed our tour of Thursday Island, including the improbable military fort that sits on one of its highest points. Green Hill Fort was built in the 1890s amid fears that Russia might invade Australia, a prospect now regarded as having been very remote.

I hope you enjoy the pictures.

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Posted by on November 25, 2013 in Cape York Peninsula, Coral Sea, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Torres Strait

 

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CAIRNS TO THE CAPE AND TORRES STRAIT BY SEA – ABOARD THE MV TRINITY BAY

MV TRINITY BAY DOCKED AT HORN ISLAND

MV TRINITY BAY DOCKED AT HORN ISLAND

Everyone should see Cape York Peninsula and the Torres Strait islands at least once. I’ve been lucky – I’ve been to both several times. I’ve been by road and air, but last week I did the journey by sea. Wow! I’d run out of adjectives within a couple of hours of leaving Cairns. Far north Queensland is a stunning place, but looking at it from a ship doing a steady 11 knots on the Coral Sea gives you time to take it in, to marvel, to get inspired.

torres chartI travelled on the MV Trinity Bay, the only working cargo vessel in Australia that also carries passengers. Its main job is to be a lifeline for remote communities on Cape York, and in Torres Strait. It carries food supplies in refrigerated or freezer containers, general freight, cars – the vast bulk of freight going north from Cairns goes on the Trinity Bay. It stops offshore of Lockhart River, and at Horn Island & Thursday Island, and then at Seisia, near the tip of the Cape. A fleet of smaller vessels take freight on to island communities around Torres Strait.

Trinity Bay can take up to 48 passengers – we had 30 – in 15 cabins. It travels inside the Great Barrier Reef, so the sea is usually calm. It’s within sight of the coast for most of the 1000 kilometre journey, but you do get to see offshore islands, sand cays, and you get a real understanding of how big the reef is, and of its environmental importance.

It’s not the best way to get to the top of the Cape – nothing can compare to the sense of adventure and accomplishment that goes with the long, dusty road trip. But the sea journey is a very close second. And you could always have the best of both – drive one way, and send you & your car back by boat. The view from the passenger deck of the Trinity Bay is always special. I hope you enjoy the pictures.

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BUT WAIT – THERE’S MORE

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AND …

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SONGS ABOUT THE GREAT GAME OF CRICKET – TONY HILLIER’S WORLD OF MUSIC

cricket

Australian cricket fans will be hoping to avenge the drubbing we were dealt by the Poms during the northern summer – we may be a long shot to regain the Ashes down under this summer, but while there’s good weather and a fair pitch, there’s always hope.

Cricket is one of the great British inventions, but the game put down deep roots here in Australia. It became part of our national discourse, our Australian identity. It’s a game in which humanity is the key attraction, where skill, character, strengths and flaws contend, where fortune and fate lurk like close-in fieldsman, where greatness or doom are always just a heart beat away. Americans shake their heads in puzzlement at a game that lasts five days and may not produce a result, a game sometimes so slow it’s possible to read a good book while watching the play and not miss a thing. These are very much part of its charm.

There’s literature and poetry about cricket – John Arlott and Neville Cardus spring to mind. And cricket has inspired many a good song – a theme explored this week on Tony Hillier’s World of Music. LISTEN here

PLAY LIST

Jiggery Pokery from the The Duckworth-Lewis Method self-titled 2009 album.

Bradman from the Paul Kelly 1987 album Under The Sun

Cricket from The Kinks 1973 album Preservation Act:1

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Posted by on November 20, 2013 in EFFINCUE, music, rd on the road, Tony Hillier's World of Music

 

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HELPING OLDER FOLKS KEEP THEIR PETS – THE PETS FOR LIFE PROJECT BEING CONSIDERED IN CAIRNS

dog-cat_1838650cThere’s plenty of evidence that having a pet is good for you – as long as you’re able to look after your dog, cat, bunny rabbit, bird, fish, chook. But what happens if your circumstances change, and you become less able to care for your pet? This can happen for many reasons, but the most likely one is ageing. As we get older, illness or infirmity might make it hard to keep the beloved family pet with you. And what happens when you decide to move into retirement accomodation or aged care? Do you have to give your pet up for adoption, or face the awful decision to have it put down?

A group of people in Cairns have been very actively working to find ways that older people can keep their pets with them – and they’re very interested in a project that has been quite a success at Caloundra, in south east Queensland. The Caloundra Community Centre has started the Pets For Life project – which puts volunteers in touch with older pet owners. The volunteers visit regularly to help look after pets, and also provide regular social contact for the owners.

Tomas Passeggi is in Cairns tonight to discuss the Pets For Life project at a public meeting. He’s the community development co-ordinator at the Caloundra Community Centre. LISTEN to my interview with Tomas here

 
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Posted by on November 14, 2013 in Cairns Queensland, community, EFFINCUE

 

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