RSS

WHAT FNQ AND ECUADOR CAN LEARN FROM EACH OTHER TO LOOK AFTER OUR FROGS

24 Oct

frogABC Far North wildlife correspondent Martin Cohen has a visitor this week –  a man who’s travelled a long way to get to far north Queensland. He’s come all the way from Ecuador to check out our frogs.

OK – it’s a bit more than checking them out. Andres Merino-Viteri is an Ecuadorian herpetologist studying the physiological thresholds of Microhylid frogs in the wet tropics. There are about 500 species of Microhylids – small frogs found in tropical zones, including here in FNQ.

ANDRES MERINO-VITERI

ANDRES MERINO-VITERI

Andres worked at the Museo de Zoología at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, hoping to find causes of the unexpected disappearance of several species of frogs along the Ecuadorian Andes during the 80s and 90s. Climate change was a key suspect, and some of these species are now possibly extinct. He’s working on his PhD project here, modelling the impacts of climate change on the range of Microhylid frogs and looking for ways to keep the frogs from extinction.

Martin and Andres met in Cairns six years ago – LISTEN to them talking about frogs and threats to frog populations here

Dr Martin Cohen is ABC Far North wildlife correspondent. Hear him on radio Wednesday afternoons at 445 or search for him on your podcast app.2 mart

Advertisements
 
Comments Off on WHAT FNQ AND ECUADOR CAN LEARN FROM EACH OTHER TO LOOK AFTER OUR FROGS

Posted by on October 24, 2013 in EFFINCUE, environment, rd on the road, wildlife and animals, Wildlife Martin Cohen

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

 
%d bloggers like this: