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Monthly Archives: June 2013

SOME VERY SPICY INDIAN MUSIC BLENDS – TONY HILLIER’S WORLD OF MUSIC JUNE 28

There’s a distinctly Indian flavour to Tony Hillier’s World of Music this week. In the early 1960s, the music of the sub-continent was one of the first musical forms from outside the English-speaking nations to gain international popularity, and it sits right at the heart of the story of the world music boom of the 1980s.

Just as musicians and music lovers in the West drew on other styles, the musicians of India have been actively embracing music from all over the world, creating a truly fascinating fusion. Two great examples feature this week.

Debashish Bhattacharya First, we sample Debashish Bhattacharya, a man of prodigious talents, descended from a long line of musicians. He’s a gifted slide guitarist, musician & composer who does not acknowledge notions of Eastern or Western music, preferring the notion of a universal music. http://www.debashishbhattacharya.com/

And we hear Rasa Duende, a collaboration between internationally acclaimed musicians Bobby Singh (Tabla), Adrian McNeil (Sarod) and Damian Wright (Flamenco Guitar). This is a lively meeting of Hindustani and flamenco styles, exploring the meeting points of rhythm and melody that is so strong an ingredient in both cultures.http://shop.abc.net.au/products/duende-r-improvisation-cd rasa-duende3

Rasa Duende play at the Tanks Arts Centre in Cairns tonight.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow for this week’s Tony Hillier’s World of Music

PLAY LIST

Rasam Samba from Debashish Bhattacharya’s new album Beyond The Ragasphere

Ektaal Por Bulerias from Rasa Duende’s debut album Improvisations

TONY HILLIER CASTTony Hillier is one of Australia’s leading music journalists and a musician of long standing here in far north Queensland. His informed and insightful coverage of music features in The Weekend Australian and Rhythms magazine http://rhythms.com.au/

.Tony Hillier’s World of Music is also available as a podcast. Search for Tony Hillier on your podcast app or in the iTunes store. And you can stay in touch with the FNQ music scene with Tony at http://www.entertainmentcairns.com/hilliers-hotline-archive.php

You can hear Tony on ABC Far North each Friday at 445pm.

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Posted by on June 28, 2013 in arts & culture, Cairns Queensland, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, music, Tony Hillier's World of Music

 

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NOW HERE’S A PROJECT! BUILD AND FLY YOUR OWN AIRCRAFT

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I built quite a few model aeroplanes as a kid. Mostly Airfix kits, and one made from scratch out of balsa wood that actually flew, powered by a small and very noisy engine. I’ll never forget the excitement, the sense of achievement I felt watching that little plane take to the sky for the first time. Now multiply that feeling by at least a hundred, and that’s what it must be like to build your own real life aircraft, one you can fly yourself and go places in.

Home built aircraft, or kit planes, are very popular in Australia – lower purchase prices and operating costs are a key factor. But many owners will tell you one of the big attractions was the challenge of building their own aircraft. There are more than 100 different types of home built aircraft flying in Australia, and there’s more on the way. One of the best known is the Jabiru http://www.jabiru.net.au/  – made in Bundaberg, the home of Australian aviation pioneer Bert Hinkler.

You buy the aircraft in kit form and it depends on you how long it’ll take to build. A good example is Cairns pilot John Martin – who took 1400 hours. Once you’ve got it registered and you have your pilot licence, you’re ready to fly.

Home built aircraft owners are represented by the Sport Aircraft Association of Australia www.saaafnq.com

Its Cairns chapter is having an information night next Thursday July 4 in Cairns for people thinking of buying or building a home built or kit plane. You’ll hear from people who’ve done it successfully, get the chance to ask questions and find out if it’s for you. The information session starts at 7pm at the North Queensland Aero Club www.nqac.com.au

LISTEN John Martin and Martin Boyle know they made the right decision. Click on the red arrow to hear John and Martin talk about building and flying their own planes.

Contact John j-martin@bigpond.net.au or Martin martinboyle53@bigpond.com for more information.

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Posted by on June 28, 2013 in Cairns Queensland, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Radio Feed, rd on the road

 

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OLD AND NEW INDIGENOUS MUSIC FROM SHELLIE MORRIS – TONY HILLIER’S WORLD OF MUSIC

349734Today, a first listen to what I think will stand as one of the most memorable releases of 2013. Ngambala Wiji li-Wunungu [Together We Are Strong] is a magical mix of old and new Australian indigenous music by Shellie Morris and the Borroloola Songwomen.

This is the latest release from the Song Peoples Sessions project – a collaboration between traditional and contemporary Australian indigenous musicians that supports protection of cultural heritage and maintenance of indigenous languages & traditional song cycles. It’s looking to create new forms of musical cultural expression while maintaining ancient traditions.

Shellie Morris is best known for her work with Black Arm Band, but long before she sang rock and folk, Shellie sang opera. She’s a child of the stolen generations, raised by a white family in Sydney, where she learned opera singing. This new project sees her in the country of her grandmother, singing in Yanyuwa, the local language that now has only about ten speakers.

The result is a two-CD release of traditional songs and new compositions celebrating Yanyuwa stories, melodies and rhythms. It powerfully evokes the spirit and feel of its place, on the Northern Territory side of the Gulf of Carpentaria, and you’ll hear the same sort of emotive power present in the work of the enigmatic NT singer Gurrumul.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear this week’s Tony Hillier’s World of Music

4401638-4x3-340x255PLAY LIST

Jiwarrmanji – Shellie Morris & The Borroloola Songwomen

Rra-Wurlumandaya  – The Borroloola Songwomen

Ngabujiyu Gurlia  – Shellie  Morris & The Borroloola Songwomen

all from the just released ABC/Universal album Ngambala Wui Li-Wunungu (Together We Are Strong)

More about Shellie Morris http://www.shelliemorris.net

More about The Song Peoples Sessions at http://songpeoples.tumblr.com/

A previous release in this project is Warren H Williams and the Warumungu Songmen: Winanjjara – Songman.

TONY HILLIER CASTTony Hillier is one of Australia’s leading music journalists and a musician of long standing here in far north Queensland. His informed and insightful coverage of music features in The Weekend Australian and Rhythms magazine http://rhythms.com.au/

.Tony Hillier’s World of Music is also available as a podcast. Search for Tony Hillier on your podcast app or in the iTunes store. And you can stay in touch with the FNQ music scene with Tony at http://www.entertainmentcairns.com/hilliers-hotline-archive.php

You can hear Tony on ABC Far North each Friday at 445pm.

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2013 in Aboriginal, arts & culture, Cape York Peninsula, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, indigenous, music, rd on the road, Tony Hillier's World of Music

 

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MEET THE AURUKUN SCHOOL BAND – COMING TO CAIRNS FOR A CONCERT IN JULY

map-of-yarrabah-photo-via-yarrabah-state-schoolYou’ll find the town of Yarrabah about an hour’s drive south-east of Cairns – an indigenous community of about 2500 people. It was formed in the 1890s, when Anglican missionary Ernest Gribble encouraged the area’s indigenous people to move to the site of the present-day town.

By the early 1900s, Yarrabah had its own indigenous brass band, beginning a rich tradition of instrumental music in the area that thrived until the early 1970s. The Queensland Music Festival hopes to spark a revival with next month’s Yarrabah Band Festival.

The Festival is on Monday July 22, with performances by the newly-formed Yarrabah community band and indigenous school bands from across Cape York Peninsula. Kids aged six and up have been working and playing music with QMF teams at Cape York Aboriginal Australian Academy campuses in Coen, Hopevale and Aurukun in preparation for the Festival.

I got to hear two of the school bands in action on our recent Cape York road trip. At Coen, we found the kids rehearsing through their lunch break, and at Aurukun, we were there when the band played for the whole school for the first time. It was a great day for the Aurukun school community.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear the Aurukun band’s first concert performance and meet their musical mentors

We heard Queensland Music Festival project coordinator Emma Kurik and Australian jazz legend John Morrison with reporter Phil Staley. The Yarrabah Band Festival begins at 4.30pm Monday 22 July at Bishop Malcolm Park Yarrabah – it’s a free event. http://www.qmf.org.au/public/public/?id=300

As part of the celebrations, visiting musicians Darren Percival (The Voice), Thelma Plum (Deadly Award Winner) and the Morrison Brothers will take to the stage before an all-in, massed-band finale.

You can watch a video of the Aurukun band at https://open.abc.net.au/openregions/qld-far-north-28qv9td/posts/brass-band-babies-94ez0gc

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Posted by on June 17, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, indigenous, music, Radio Feed, rd on the road

 

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MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL 2013 – TONY HILLIER’S WORLD OF MUSIC

TONY HILLIER CASTEach Friday we share the best new music and explore fascinating musical themes on ABC Far North – in Tony Hillier’s World of Music.

Tony Hillier is one of Australia’s leading music journalists and a musician of long standing here in far north Queensland. His informed and insightful coverage of music features in The Weekend Australian and Rhythms magazine http://rhythms.com.au/

.Tony Hillier’s World of Music is also available as a podcast. Search for Tony Hillier on your podcast app or in the iTunes store. And you can stay in touch with the FNQ music scene with Tony at http://www.entertainmentcairns.com/hilliers-hotline-archive.php

You can hear Tony on ABC Far North each Friday at 445pm. This week, we feature artists who performed at the Melbourne International Jazz Festival last week. http://www.melbournejazz.com/v2013/webpages/home.php

First up, Grammy winning jazz singer Cassandra Wilson – her unusual blend of jazz, country, blues and folk has proved popular with Australian music lovers for more than 20 years. Then we sample the intoxicating mix of soul, rumba, jazz, flamenco and more that is the music of Concha Buika. And we hear the amazing Cuban pianist & bandleader Chucho Valdés.

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear Tony Hillier’s World of Music

PLAY LIST

No More Blues from Cassandra Wilson’s new album Another Country

Somos from Concha Buika’s 2011 album In My Skin

Santa Cruz from the new Chucho Valdes album with the Afro-Cuban Messengers Border-Free

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Posted by on June 14, 2013 in EFFINCUE, PODCASTS, rd on the road, Tony Hillier's World of Music

 

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WARNER & TAMOU OUT AS THE RUMBLE ON THE REEF ROLLS IN TO CAIRNS – PHIL STALEY’S THOUGHTS ON SPORTS 14/06/13

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Australians love their sport – but I reckon no-one loves their sport quite like our Phil Staley. Indoor, outdoor, winter summer or somewhere in between – Phil loves it all. Stand at his desk here at ABC Far North and you get the feeling you’ve just run on to Lang Park or the MCG.

Phil has a gift for talking about sport in a way that even people who can’t stand sport will enjoy. He gets past the hype and the stats to the magic ingredient that makes sport so compelling – the people who play it and the people who love it.Phil talks about sport each Friday on ABC Far North at 5:15pm – now you can tune in online as well.

This week: the NRL over-rules itself in dealing with NQ Cowboy James Tamou for drink driving, David Warner out of the cricket Champions Trophy over a night-club stoush, and the NRL Rumble on the Reef rolls in to Cairns – the South Sydney Rabbitohs v Gold Coast Titans at Barlow Park this Sunday.

 
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Posted by on June 14, 2013 in Cairns Queensland, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Phil Staley Thoughts on Sports, PODCASTS

 

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THE JAMES COOK LANDING RE-ENACTMENT 2013 – COOKTOWN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

RE-ENACTMENT CAST TAKE A BOW

RE-ENACTMENT CAST TAKE A BOW

n June of 1770, the British vessel HMS Endeavour was sailing along the far north Queensland coast. Captain James Cook and his crew had travelled far since leaving England in August 1768. Their luck was not with them this day and the Endeavour struck a reef north of Cape Tribulation. Many place names in the area derive from this story: Mount Sorrow, Endeavour Reef, and Cape Tribulation.

Cook and his crew nursed the Endeavour up the coast to an inviting river mouth and beached the ship at what is now Cooktown. Repairs were made, and then they waited for favourable weather in which to set sail for England. In all, the Englishmen stayed almost seven weeks at Cooktown. The local indigenous people, the Guugu Yimithirr, had seen them coming and kept their distance, but they eventually made contact with these strange, pale visitors. There was curiosity on both sides of the encounter, conflict, and the first act of reconciliation between indigenous Australians and Europeans. And it’s the first time the word “kangaroo” entered the English language.Botanist Joseph Banks recorded it in his diary, having asked the name of a local creature that baffled the Englishmen. Gangurru is the Guugu Yimithirr word for “grey kangaroo”.

Every June since 1960, on the Queen’s Birthday weekend, the people of Cooktown re-enact the events of 1770. The Queen saw it herself in 1970, during the Cook bicentennial. The event is the centre-piece of the annual Cooktown Discovery Festival http://www.cooktowndiscoveryfestival.com.au/

The Cook landing re-enactment has changed considerably in its 54 years. It’s a faithful telling of Cook’s own account, recorded in his journals, and has more recently included an indigenous perspective, drawn from Guugu Yimithirr oral history. The result is an engaging and informative spectacle, complete with costumes, musket fire and an enormous kangaroo. And it takes place right where the events depicted really occured, 243 years ago.

More about Cooktown http://www.tourismcapeyork.com/

Read about the James Cook Museum in Cooktown http://www.nationaltrust.org.au/qld/james-cook-museum

LISTEN Click on the red arrow to hear highlights of the 54th re-enactment of the Cook landing

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Posted by on June 14, 2013 in Aboriginal, Cape York Peninsula, Coral Sea, EFFINCUE, far north Queensland, Radio Feed, rd on the road

 

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