RSS

FREDERICK PIGGOTT AND THE RISE OF FORENSIC SCIENCE IN AUSTRALIAN POLICE WORK

17 May

DETECTIVE FREDERICK PIGGOTT OF THE MELBOURNE CIB IN A NEWSPAPER PHOTO CAPTIONED “ALAS POOR YORICK”

If you watch any of the cop shows on TV, or if you’re unlucky enough to be the victim of a crime, you’ll see plenty of science in the way police investigate crimes. Fingerprints, DNA, footprints, tyre tracks, every possible fragment of physical evidence can be examined scientifically to establish who did the deed and prove a case against the perpetrator.

Forensic science is at the heart of modern police work. But you don’t have to go back very far to a time when this was not the case. Police were hired for their brawn more than their brains. Witnesses and informants were the main sources of what sometimes loosely passed as “evidence”.

The earliest use of what we now know as forensic science in Australia dates back to the 1920s, and the pioneer was Frederick Piggott, a detective with the Victoria Police CIB. His story is eloquently told in a new book by Melbourne author Kevin Morgan, Detective Piggott’s Casebook.

Frederick Piggott solved some major cases using the new methods. But he was also involved in the infamous Gun Alley case, in which forensic science was used to hang an innocent man.

Click on the audio player to hear Kevin Morgan talk about Detective Piggott’s Casebook.

Link to publisher’s website http://www.hardiegrant.com.au/books/books/book?isbn=9781742702650


Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on May 17, 2012 in EFFINCUE, rd on the road

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

One response to “FREDERICK PIGGOTT AND THE RISE OF FORENSIC SCIENCE IN AUSTRALIAN POLICE WORK

  1. Stephan Demora

    January 15, 2013 at 3:32 AM

    forensic science is a very interesting subject, i really love to become a CSI agent.:

    My current blog
    http://www.caramoan.org/caramoan-beach-resort/

     
 
%d bloggers like this: